6. Jan, 2013

New Year Violence

 

New Year violence a symptom of deeper malaise

 

 A man was shot dead, another was left fighting for his life and a series of stabbings, serious bashings, glassings and other incidents marked Australia’s New Year's Eve.

 

Just a few minutes after midnight, two young men broke into a pensioner couple’s home on the east coast, held the 73 year old woman in a head-lock, hit the old man on his head and stole cash, wallets, mobile phones and so forth and made away. Real heroes.

 

In South Australia police made 121 arrests for behavioural offences, and in Sydney 97 people faced a range of charges including drug supply and possession, assault, affray, assaulting police and malicious damage. That was almost double the number arrested in Sydney last year, but, incredulously, the police said they were happy with the outcome.

 

'While there have been a few idiots trying to spoil the end of the evening for others, it is good to see most revellers celebrated within their limits,' Assistant Commissioner Alan Clark said. [Bigpond News Tues. 1 Jan, 2013]. I wonder what he had to say the following day when 6 of his officers were seriously assaulted whilst attending a domestic dispute at Bankstown. A few idiots’ cannot express enough opprobrium for the scum that send at least three officers to hospital.

 

Yet so inured have we become to violence in our society that, as we read this latest litany of horror, we make clucking noises of righteous indignation and move on. However, this increasing societal violence and amorality is something we cannot continue to ignore.

 

The ever increasing violence in society is a reflection of a much deeper social malaise. Karl Marx used the term alienation with great precision to describe the individual’s gradual disaffection and estrangement from society. In my essay Politics of Greed posted on this site I address, in part, this subject.

 

 

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